Quotes for "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe"

C. S. Lewis

  • There might be eagles. There might be stags. There’ll be hawks.” “Badgers!” said Lucy. “Foxes!” said Edmund. “Rabbits!” said Susan.
  • “That’s easy,” answered the Queen. “Do you see that lamp?” She pointed with her wand and Edmund turned and saw the same lamp-post under which Lucy had met the Faun. “Straight on, beyond that, is the way to the World of Men. And now look the other way”—here
  • a red breast. It’s the first bird I’ve seen here. I say!—I wonder can birds talk in Narnia? It almost looks as if it wanted to say something to us.” Then she turned to the Robin and said, “Please, can you tell us where Tumnus the Faun has been taken to?”
  • When Adam’s flesh and Adam’s bone Sits at Cair Paravel in throne, The evil time will be over and done.
  • “Wherever is this?” said Peter’s voice, sounding tired and pale in the darkness. (I hope you know what I mean by a voice sounding pale.)
  • “It’s all right,” he was shouting. “Come out, Mrs. Beaver. Come out, Sons and Daughters of Adam. It’s all right! It isn’t Her!” This was bad grammar of course, but that is how beavers talk when they are excited; I mean, in Narnia—in our world they usually don’t talk at all.
  • “Why, sir?” said Lucy. “I think—I don’t know—but I think I could be brave enough.” “That is not the point,” he said. “But battles are ugly when women fight.
  • The dwarf obeyed, and in a few minutes Edmund found himself being forced to walk as fast as he could with his hands tied behind him. He kept on slipping in the slush and mud and wet grass, and every time he slipped the dwarf gave him a curse and sometimes a flick with the whip. The Witch walked behind the dwarf
  • “Here is your brother,” he said, “and—there is no need to talk to him about what is past.” Edmund shook hands with each of the others and said to each of them in turn, “I’m sorry,” and everyone said, “That’s all right.”
  • You at least know the Magic which the Emperor put into Narnia at the very beginning. You know that every traitor belongs to me as my lawful prey and that for every treachery I have a right to a kill.”
  • At last they heard Aslan’s voice, “You can all come back,” he said. “I have settled the matter. She has renounced the claim on your brother’s blood.”
  • “No,” said Aslan in a dull voice, as if it didn’t matter. “No. She will not make an attack tonight.”
  • apparently the Witch had been using her wand. But she did not seem to be using it now. She was fighting with her stone knife. It was Peter she was fighting—both
  • And they made good laws and kept the peace
  • But amid all these rejoicings Aslan himself quietly slipped away. And when the Kings and Queens noticed that he wasn’t there they said nothing about it.
  • Susan grew into a tall and gracious woman
  • And Peter became a tall and deep-chested man and a great warrior,
  • “I know not how it is, but this lamp on the post worketh upon me strangely. It runs in my mind that I have seen the like before; as it were in a dream,
  • But don’t go trying to use the same route twice.