Quotes for "The Age of Em"

Robin Hanson

  • Of course by not considering any particular regulations, I can also be accused of being biased against regulation. When it comes to avoiding accusations of political bias, there is no absolutely safe ground in social science.
  • This book violates a standard taboo, in that it assumes that our social systems will mostly fail to prevent outcomes that many find lamentable, such as robots dominating the world, sidelining ordinary humans, and eliminating human abilities to earn wages. Once we have framed a topic as a problem that we’d want our social systems to solve, it is taboo to discuss the consequences of a failure to solve that problem. Discussing such consequences is usually only acceptable as a way to scare people into trying harder to solve the problem. Instead, analyzing in detail the consequences of failure, to learn how to live with such failure, is widely seen as expressing disloyalty to your social systems and hostility toward those who would suffer from its failure.
  • Jordan, Gabriele, Samir Deeb, Jenny Bosten, and J. D. Mollon. 2010. “The Dimensionality of Color Vision in Carriers of Anomalous Trichromacy.” Journal of Vision 10(8): 12.
  • As the loyalty and reliability of an em is especially important in unusual crisis situations, simulations designed to test loyalties disproportionately portray such situations. Thus an em who finds itself in what seems to be an unusual crisis should suspect that it is in a simulation designed to test its loyalty and ability.
  • Retired ems are also good for unspecialized everyman roles, such as juror or voter, if they aren’t running too slowly to sufficiently understand the current society.
  • Such ghosts are real, and with trouble one can talk to them, but they aren’t very useful as allies, they get less moral weight, and one can usually ignore them without much cost. Because ems must pay
  • Ghosts are anti-social, avoid groups of more than a few humans, don’t seem to collect into ghost gangs
  • Such ghosts are real, and with trouble one can talk to them, but they aren’t very useful as allies, they get less moral weight, and one can usually ignore them without much cost.
  • we often most mourn the deaths of young adults, in whom we have invested the most yet gained the least.
  • Human aversion to death has many causes, but surely a big one is that growing productive humans takes years. For us, death can be a very expensive loss;
  • When life is cheap, death can be cheap as well.
  • Individual em copies may come to see the choice to end a copy not as “Shall I end?” but instead as “Do I want to remember this?”
  • Today, we are aware that suicide can have large opportunity costs,
  • suicide switches could help ems respond to threats such as torture or rape.
  • History shows that slave owners are the most eager to create and own slaves when wages are high and rising. When wages are low it costs nearly as much to feed and house a slave as it does to hire a free worker ( Domar 1970 ).